Text to Text: A Strategy for Common Core Close Reading

» 26 September 2013 » In How To, Literacy, Strategies » 5 Comments

The-Scarlet-Letter-1917The NY Times Learning Network has just launched a new series of lesson plans called "Text to Text." It's a simple approach that pairs two written texts that "speak to each other." I think it's a Common Core close reading strategy that could be easily replicated by teachers across the curriculum - great way to blend nonfiction with fiction and incorporate a variety of media with written text.

Each lesson includes a key question, extension activities and additional resources to expand the basic lesson. Here's two graphic organizers to help student organize their "Text to Text" thinking. (free PFD downloads)
Comparing Two or More Texts
Double-Entry Chart for Close Reading

The NY TImes plans to continue the series at the Learning Network - tagged Text to Text
To date they have created three sample lessons:

"The Scarlet Letter" and "Sexism and the Single Murderess"
Key Question: To what extent is there still a sexual double standard, and how does that double standard play out in contemporary culture?
It pairs a passage from "The Scarlet Letter" with a recent Op-Ed article that, together, invite discussion on societal attitudes toward female sexuality.

"Where Do Your Genes Come From?" and "DNA Double Take"
Key Question: How are recent advances in science changing our understanding of the genome, and how might this affect fields like forensic science or genetic counseling?
It matches a Times article with often-taught scientific, historic, cultural or literary material. This edition is about new findings in genetics.

"Edward Snowden and Daniel Ellsberg"
Key Question | Is Snowden a Hero, a Traitor or Something Else?
It pairs two Times articles that capture parallel moments in history: Daniel Ellsberg’s surrender to the police in 1971 after leaking the Pentagon Papers, and Edward Snowden’s public admission in June that he leaked classified documents about United States surveillance programs.

Image credit: 1917 Film version of "The Scarlet Letter" - publicity still (cropped)
L. to R Stuart Holmes, Kittens Reichert & Mary Martin Date

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PBL: I Come to Understanding by Making

» 11 September 2013 » In Commentary » No Comments

Matthew-Shlian-featured

Watch this short video as Matthew Shlian talks about himself, how he learns and the role that curiosity plays in his work. Then think about the kind of classroom that would foster Matt and learners like him. He states, A lot of my work is about curiosity. I come to understanding by making. If I can see what something’s going to look like when it’s finished, then I don’t want to make it. That would be like filling out a form.

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Teaching Big History

» 22 August 2013 » In Ed Tech, History / DBQ's, Projects, Strategies, Web 2.0 » 2 Comments

Big history

Just launched – The Big History project is a free online course that weaves evidence and insights from many scientific and historical disciplines across 13.7 billion years into a single, cohesive story. Here’s info on how you can join this project as a teacher or student. The course highlights common themes and patterns that can help us better understand people, civilizations, and the world we live in.

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Think Like a Historian: Close Reading at the Museum

» 22 April 2013 » In History / DBQ's, How To, Literacy, PD, Strategies, Students » 4 Comments

Hercules-featured

The Common Core encourages students to more closely read a text (in all it’s multimedia formats) by answering three critical questions: What did it say? How did it say it? What’s it mean to me? Here I model a Common Core close reading of my visit to a museum exhibit. I’ll dig a little deeper into the three questions with a few more prompts and provide answers as if I were a high school student reflecting on their experience.

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