Music and the Vietnam Anti-War Movement

» 30 December 2013 » In Ed Tech, History / DBQ's, Projects » No Comments

photographs of nick dewolf photographs of nick dewolf

This concludes a series of guest posts from my preservice teachers at University of Portland. They had the task of using Learnist to design a document based question that would eventually become part of a class-produced DBQ iBook collection. DBQ assignment here. More samples of student-designed DBQs here.

I’ve asked them to reflect on the assignment and invited them to guest post on my blog. Here is The Vietnam War designed by Samuel TS Kelley. His DBQ explores the relationship between the civil rights movement and the Vietnam war as reflected in the music videos of the era.

You can find Samuel on Twitter and see his posts on our class blog.

See Samuel’s chapter in our class-designed iBook - free at iTunes.

Samuel TS Kelley reflects on what he learned from the experience:

Using a famous or popular document doesn’t really help the student to begin answering questions on their own. It is much more important to use a document that allows the student to be the historian and reach logical conclusions about the time period.

This DBQ does a good job of using the documents and songs to generate questions that the students can answer using only the given sources. Despite this, I had trouble coming up with overall questions about the unit. I kept refining the topic until I had a good theme to work with. I was already using some music as evidence, and I added a couple songs to make the music of the time central to the DBQ. This also changed the main idea of the DBQ, which shifted from a focus on the civil rights movement to the general anti-war movement (although civil rights were still very important to the DBQ).

Overall, I learned a lot from this assignment, especially about using documents that are most conducive to the student’s knowledge level. Using a famous or popular document doesn’t really help the student to begin answering questions on their own. It is much more important to use a document that allows the student to be the historian and reach logical conclusions about the time period. I am excited to continue to use DBQ’s to teach students to examine, analyze, and interpret the documents in ways that will engage their critical thinking skills, and let the students do the work of a historian when trying to establish facts and conclusions about the time period.

Image credit: Flickr / nick dewolf photo archive 
101970 07 04 ~ Boston Common,October 1970. 
Part of an archival project, featuring the photographs of Nick Dewolf

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The Power of Propaganda: A Student-Designed DBQ

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One of my University of Portland pre-service teachers showcases his online DBQ “The Power of Propaganda.” It documents WWII and Cold War-era films and posters from multiple perspectives.

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Two Worlds Meet: Europeans in the New World

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One of my University of Portland pre-service teachers showcases his online DBQ “Cross-Cultural Contact Between Native American and European Conquerors.” It documents European – Native American contact in the Age of Exploration.

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The Easter Rising: Irish Rebellion 1916

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One of my University of Portland pre-service teachers showcases his online DBQ – “The Irish Revolutionary Period.” It challenges students to think about the timing, participants, and significance of the Irish War of Independence, ensuing Civil War, and continued conflict over the country’s partition. Peter Gallagher also reflects on the experience of designing DBQs.

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Media Manipulation: Vietnam War DBQ

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One of my University of Portland pre-service teachers showcases his online DBQ – “Media and War: An Analysis of Vietnam War Propaganda.” It provides a selection of media from opposing perspectives and asks the reader to answer the following question: How does media impact our perception of war? Damian Wierzbicki also reflects on the experience of designing DBQs.

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Anne Frank: A Primary Source DBQ

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One of my University of Portland pre-service teachers showcases her online DBQ – “Anne Frank: A Timeless Story.” She explores Anne’s diary as historic source document. Erin Deatherage also reflects on the experience of designing DBQs.

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Visions of Freedom: The American Revolution

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I’ve asked my University of Portland students to reflect on a DBQ assignment and invited them to guest post on my blog. Here is “Visions of Freedom: The American Revolution” – a DBQ designed by Collin Soderberg-Chase. This DBQ presents multiple “views of freedom” viewed through the “lenses” of differing perspectives held during American revolutionary era. The essential question examines what factors influence one’s vision of freedom.

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Visual Rhetoric of Women’s Suffrage

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Two of my University of Portland pre-service teachers showcase their online DBQ “Propaganda of the American Suffrage Movement, c. 1910-1920.” This DBQ is designed to encourage students to think critically about the American suffrage movement propaganda. The generative questions are: “How do images express biases?” and “How are political, social, and economic factors presented?” Heather Treanor and Cory Cassanova also reflects on the experience of designing DBQs.

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Image and Emotion / WWII Propaganda Posters

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One of my University of Portland pre-service teachers showcases his online DBQ “Image and Emotion – WWII Propaganda Posters.” Five propaganda themes are explored through parallel sets of posters from US and Axis power. Aram Glick also reflects on the experience of designing DBQs.

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1950s Red Scare – A Student Designed DBQ

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Two of my University of Portland pre-service teachers showcases their online DBQ “1950s Red Scare.” Videos, posters and documents use a media lens to consider “How does a nation develop such an intense fear and enemy, creating mass hysteria?” Christina Steiner and Kristi Convissor also reflect on the experience of designing DBQs.

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