Students at the Center of the Learning

» 08 September 2014 » In Commentary, Ed Tech, History / DBQ's, How To, Strategies, Students, Teachers » No Comments

Thomas Hawk - Hub and SpokesIn the early part of my high school social studies teaching career, I saw myself at the center of the classroom. I was the focal point of the learning. I played resident historian - reading, crafting lectures and dispensing history to my students. They were on the periphery of the learning - waiting for my instructions, checking back with me for approval, giving me back my lecture on the unit test. Even the whole class discussions "flowed through” the teacher. Students directed their responses to me. I commented after each student with my approval or directing another student to give it a try. Without realizing it, I taught my students the only thing worth knowing was something coming from their teacher.

With time I learned to stop working so hard at being the smartest person in the room. With practice, I honed the skills of an instructional designer - an architect of learning environments - “spaces” where the thinking was done by my students.

I try to model that “architectural approach” in my social studies methods class. Take a look at today’s class, (University of Portland) you’ll see that I’m not the focal point of the lesson. By “flipping” a few instructional components and providing a student-driven evaluation, my students will be at the heart of the lesson. I’ll be floating at the periphery. Here’s a summary:

The students have written drafts for their first authored posts on EdMethods, our class WordPress blog. While I assigned the format of their post - they have selected the content. Before posting they will go through two peer reviews in today’s class and then make revisions based on the feedback. Instead of writing for their teacher they are writing for the web. Rather than being graded by the teacher, the quality of their work will be assessed by their peers before they “turn it in” for publication on the web.

Most of my students are new to WordPress. Rather than force the whole class to sit through my “How to use WordPress” lecture, I used the SnagIt Chrome extension to prepare ten brief (under 2 mins) video micro-lessons on posting to WordPress. Students can use that "just-in-time instruction" for exactly what they need to complete the posting process. That frees me to work with students who might want to make major revisions to their posts or need extra help with WordPress.

Next week, our class will focus on historic thinking skills. I want to use our class time to actually dohistorical thinking tasks, so I wanted to flip the content delivery. I used TEDEd’s great lesson builder to annotate an existing YouTube video with questions, student reflections and further readings. See Who is the historian in your classroom?

Interesting in flipping a lesson? Here's info on my Flipped Classroom Workshop

Who is the historian in your classroom


Image Credit:
Flickr: Thomas Hawk - Hub and Spokes

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How to Read Documentary Films

» 26 August 2014 » In History / DBQ's, How To, Strategies » 2 Comments

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Lesson on using films as documents to develop historical thinking skills in sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating and close reading. The lesson compares two documentary films detailing the forced removal and incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII. The first film was made in 1943 by the US government to justify the action. The second film was made in 2014 and features interviews with Japanese American incarcerees.

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How to Read Documentary Photographs

» 12 August 2014 » In History / DBQ's, How To, Strategies » No Comments

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Lesson on using photographs as documents to develop historical thinking skills in sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating and close reading. Features material from “Uprooted” a museum exhibit and website that showcases the photography of Russell Lee, staff photographer for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and his work at the Japanese American farm labor camps of WWII.

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How To Use Social Media to Network Your PLN

» 23 July 2014 » In Ed Tech, How To, PD, Social Web » 1 Comment

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Here’s ideas I’ll be using for training my university students on how to use social media for networking and professional growth. As a proof of concept, I crowdsourced via social media for some ideas that I might incorporate into my grad / undergrad social studies methods course. I used Storify to collect all the great suggestions that came in.

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A Satiric Lesson in Media Literacy

» 27 March 2014 » In How To, Literacy, Strategies, Visualizations » No Comments

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Kendra Eash’s essay becomes a satiric video skewering the clichéd corporate message ad as a meaningless montage of grandiloquent pablum. Used as a prompt for a lesson in visual literacy.

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Free: How To Get Started with iBooks Author

» 02 March 2014 » In How To, Publishing » No Comments

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Here’s my free multi-touch iBook that will get you started using iBooks Author. Includes an interactive tour of the app, widget sampler with settings, and tips and tricks for designing your iBook and managing your work flow.

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iPDX14 Session Preview: Getting Started with iBooks Author

» 24 February 2014 » In How To, Presentations, Publishing » 3 Comments

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Here’s your chance to learn how easy it is for students and teachers to create multi-touch iBooks using iBA. We’ll demonstrate the key steps in designing an iBook that can be published to iTunes or shared as iBooks files. Download my free 20-page “Quick Start: iBooks Author.” Links to more how to’s and free content resources for your iBook project – interactive widgets, images, videos, audio and more.

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Tips for Motivating Student Writers with iBooks Author

» 05 January 2014 » In Ed Tech, History / DBQ's, How To, Publishing, Students » 9 Comments

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My preservice teachers just published an iBook collection of document-based questions in US and World History. It’s now available free at iTunes. Here’s some tips on how to turn your students into published authors.

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iBooks Author Widgets on Mavericks Desktop

» 24 October 2013 » In Ed Tech, History / DBQ's, How To, Publishing » 6 Comments

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I’ve been anxiously awaiting the chance to see if iBooks Author widgets would make it to the desktop in the new Mavericks version of iBooks. I’m pleased to report that all the iBA – created widgets run perfectly. Plus, viewing an iBook on 27” Thunderbolt display is awesome.

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Student Consultants Design Museum Curriculum and Mobile App

» 17 October 2013 » In Ed Tech, History / DBQ's, How To, Projects, Strategies, Students, Teachers » No Comments

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While planning my history methods course, I approached the museum with a simple question – “What could you do with a dozen unpaid curriculum consultants?” And so our partnership began – my pre-service history teachers working with professionals at the museum to develop educational material to support their collection. I wanted my student so experience project-based learning from the perspective of the learner in the hopes that they would someday incorporate that approach into their teaching.

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