The Flipped Classroom: An Infographic Explanation

» 24 January 2012 » In Ed Tech, How To, Strategies, Teachers, Visualizations »

As I posted in How to Flip Your Classroom – and Get Your Students to Do the Work 

The "flipped" classroom - This is the idea that teachers shoot videos of their lessons, then make them available online for students to view at home. Class time is then devoted to problem solving – with the teacher acting as a guide to teams of students. It’s a great approach that flips the delivery of the lesson to homework – it’s like a TiVo time shift that can reshape your classroom.
… [we saw] flipping the class as a great opportunity to engage our students in taking more responsibility for their learning. Why not let your students curate the video lessons from existing content on the web?

Here's an infographic explanation from Column Five Media

Flipped Classroom

Infographic credit:  Column Five Media

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10 Comments on "The Flipped Classroom: An Infographic Explanation"

  1. peter
    Samantha Morra
    24/01/2012 at 4:41 pm Permalink

    I actually turned that flipped classroom infographic into a Prezi for a staff meeting http://prezi.com/w6kxyuofftts/the-flipped-classroom/
    It was more fun than just talking about it.
    Tweeted it out there to Knewton to let them know. They were so cool about it.

  2. peter
    Peter Pappas
    24/01/2012 at 5:05 pm Permalink

    Samantha,
    I checked it out and it’s a very clever modification of an infographic.
    I’m a big fan of Prezi, and this is cool mashup! Sort of scrapbooking meets web 2.0.
    Cheers,
    Peter

  3. peter
    Mary
    25/01/2012 at 1:42 pm Permalink

    In the beginning of the infographic you make it sound like the main point of “flipping” a classroom is delivering instruction online… but it seems as if that’s not really the case, since the videos are only 5-7 minutes long and students can watch them in class if they don’t have internet. I think the real point is that teachers don’t need to spend an entire classtime lecturing on something that they can convey in just a few minutes. Of course students are going to learn better if they are solving problems and working on things themselves, rather than just absorbing and regurgitating whatever a teacher tells them.

  4. peter
    Peter Pappas
    25/01/2012 at 3:03 pm Permalink

    At it essence, most instruction has two elements – the transfer of content / skill and then the opportunity for the learner to do something with it – such as assimilate and apply in a different context. In schools, we have traditionally focused on transfer (via lecture) and let the assimilation happen (maybe) on the students own time. Ironically transfer is easy (especially in digital age) tough part is assimilation.

    I agree with you, teachers don’t need to spend precious class time on lecture. And flipping could open up more class time for assimilation of the learning.

    Finally, let me clarify that I did not create the infographic – just reposted it.

    Thanks for your comment.

  5. peter
    Tony Amsler
    26/01/2012 at 7:24 am Permalink

    Or, consider flipping your classroom “in” your classroom for part of the period! This can further enable individualized instruction.

  6. peter
    Peter Pappas
    26/01/2012 at 10:29 am Permalink

    Good point Tony, especially when students may not have access at home. Many ways to manage the viewing / processing both in / out of the classroom.

  7. peter
    Lana Sprague
    13/02/2013 at 7:32 am Permalink

    I have a principal that wants to flip with the teachers. My school district blocks Utube and atube catcher plus some blogs. What is a good resource to use to upload the videos to for distribution and comments from teachers

  8. peter
    Peter Pappas
    13/02/2013 at 8:44 am Permalink

    Hi Lana,
    I’d talk to your district IT leadership and see if they can fine tune their firewall settings. You might see if they can allow YouTube for Schools or TeacherTube which have more controlled environments.

    Ask IT to look at the options available for flipping videos using the TED-Ed tools. Some great tools there for teachers to manage flipped videos.

    Finally – if they can’t open the firewalls, then they need to think about providing some tools in the district network / CMS to allow teachers to extend teaching and learning 24/7.

    Good luck ~ Peter

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  1. [...] the flipped classroom model, I read two blogs to find out more about this new teaching structure.  The Flipped …

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